Webinar-How to Harvest Your Own Clams in Rhode Island


Tuesday, March 27th
Click the below link to join:

Brush Up Those Clamming Skills: Ready yourself for summer by joining URI Coastal Resources Center/Rhode Island Sea Grant sustainable seafood specialist Azure Cygler and local quahogging legend Jody King for a webinar. King, host of a state-sponsored “Come Clam With Me” summer program for the public, will share the basics of recreational clamming – from where to go and what to bring, to tools of the trade and tips for delicious clam dishes.

The webinar is a program of the Rhode Island Shellfish Initiative. The Initiative “honors the legacy and vital role shellfish play in supporting our environment, families, traditions, and economy. Through a partnership of government, business, academia, and community, the Initiative will strengthen our state’s shellfish management practices and promote growth and innovation within out local seafood industry. Visit the Initiative at http://www.shellfishri.com/ri-shellfish-initiative/ or email/call Cygler at acygler@uri.edu or 401-874-6197.

Video Takes You on the Water with a Quahogger

For hundreds of years, people have harvested quahogs from Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island, for sustenance and income. This video gives you a first-hand glimpse into this iconic New England way of life with quahogger Dave Andrade. CRC worked closely with this community and a broad range of stakeholders to develop Rhode Island’s first Shellfish Management Plan.

New Book Reveals R.I.’s Shellfish Heritage

shellishbookcoverCRC partnered with URI’s Coastal Institute and Rhode Island Sea Grant to sponsor the newly published book,  “Rhode Island’s Shellfish Heritage: An Ecological History” by Sarah Schumann.

The book details the history of the state’s iconic shellfish and tells the stories of the people and communities who harvest, grow, sell and enjoy Rhode Island’s rich and delicious native catch. You can purchase the publication, which comes alive with historic and contemporary photographs, or read it online on the R.I. Sea Grant website.

CRC Helping to Craft Vibrio Control Plan for Oysters

CRC’s work on a vibrio control plan for Rhode Island is featured in the Sept. 1 edition of ecoRInews and on URI’s homepage. Vibrio is a bacterium that can grow in improperly handled oysters and sicken people. The story was written by CRC Communications Specialist Sue Kennedy and features Azure Cyler, Fisheries and Aquaculture Specialist.