Lazar Leads Panel at International Forum

CRC senior fisheries management adviser, Najih Lazar, was invited to lead a high-level panel and discussion at the Crans Montana Forum on Africa and South-South Cooperation in Dakhla, Morocco, from March 15 to 20. Portrait of Lazar
The forum brought together heads of state and government, ministers, regional and international organizations, and above all key businesses based in Africa and the South-South.

Lazar led the panel “Ocean Economy and Fishing Industry, A Strategic Sector for Africa,” which addressed issues of concern for the Blue Belt Initiative, a South-South integrated regional cooperation and development tool. Those issues included:

1. Economic potential of the fishing industry
2. Understanding climate-change challenges to sustainability and food security
3. Supporting new integrated coastal observation systems and facilitating their integration globally
4. Encouraging actions for sustainable fishing on the entire value chain in order to
fight ocean warming
5. Fostering the development of sustainable aquaculture, particularly seaweed farming

Web site Home Page for Blue Belt
Lazar is very proud of the Blue Belt Initiative. (It’s Web site just recently launched.) Blue Belt established an African collaborative platform to find practical and locally developed solutions for the impact of climate change on fisheries and aquaculture sectors.

Lazar’s work upholds CRC’s reputation as an organization where talented, experienced, technical staff are engaged in coastal science and management challenges around the world.

CRC to Hire Business Coordinator for International Projects

The Center is adding an experienced business administrator to its International Team. The Coordinator. International Field Projects will help directors, principal investigators, and technical staff manage the business and fiscal operations of a growing portfolio of multi-institutional, multi-million-dollar projects that are ongoing in several countries around the world.

Responsibilities include administrative, financial, and support services, and operation of systems that track expenses and cash flows relative to annual work budgets.

The successful applicant will possess a bachelor’s degree in business, accounting, or a related field and a minimum of five years of business management experience, including budget preparation and personnel management, income and expense analysis, and managing federal research grants and contracts.

With a unique balance for each project, CRC’s international programs focus on and support: 1) Safe, local, abundant, and sustainable seafood; 2) Thriving coastal communities; 3) Vibrant, well-managed oceans, coasts, and watersheds.

Complete details about this position can be found on the URI Web site at:

https://jobs.uri.edu/postings/3261

CRC a Key Partner in New USAID Project for Madagascar

CRC recently received the great news that a new USAID project in Madagascar has been given the green light.

The project, titled Hay Tao (or “know-how” in Malagasy), will focus on natural resource management and involve several partners, including the World Resources Institute and Blue Ventures, with whom CRC currently collaborates in Madagascar on capacity development for managers of locally managed marine areas. A lagoon in Madagascar

Hay Tao’s lead is Pact, a nonprofit international development organization that works around the world to improve the lives of those challenged by poverty and marginalization. CRC will lead the efforts that focus on coastal communities and marine protected areas. This project will draw on the Center’s more than two decades of similar experience in the Western Indian Ocean region.

The project announcement was made on World Wildlife Day.  According to USAID: “Hay Tao is the largest U.S. environmental investment in Madagascar in nearly a decade and represents the U.S. government’s strong commitment to preserving Madagascar’s unique environmental heritage.” The press release from USAID continues: “Hay Tao, a five-year activity valued at $23 million USD, will be one of two major activities under a Conservation and Communities Project (CCP) operated by USAID. CCP will focus on strengthening and empowering local communities to lead the way on managing nearby natural resources ‘from reefs to rainforests to regulators.’”

Ghana Celebrates Independence Day

Wood Carving of Ghana Fishing Canoe

On its Independence Day, we celebrate our Ghanaian partners in their accomplishments over the last 61 years.  We look forward to continue working with them on ongoing challenges for food security, such as developing a sustainable fishery and managing the Fall Armyworm infestation regionally.

Here are some links to recent efforts:

Fisheries and Food Security: A briefing from the USAID/Ghana Sustainable Fisheries Management Project, January 2018:
http://www.crc.uri.edu/download/GH2014_POL055_CRC_FIN508.pdf

Issue Brief: Ghana’s Small Pelagic Fishery in Crisis, National and Regional Food Security at Risk: http://www.crc.uri.edu/download/GH2014_COM003_CRC_FIN508.pdf

Regional efforts on the Fall Armyworm: https://www.usaid.gov/benin/press-releases/02-13-2018-fall-armyworm-workshop-benin-press

Walsh to Lead Center

 

Portrait of J.P. Walsh
CRC Director, Dr. J.P. Walsh

CRC is pleased to announce that in January Dr. J.P. Walsh will take the helm as the Center’s new director. Dr. Walsh, a coastal geoscientist, comes to URI after serving as Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences at East Carolina University (ECU), where he also was a Senior Scientist in the Institute for Coastal Science and Policy and the Co-Program Head of Coastal Processes at the University of North Carolina Coastal Studies Institute. His work explores how sedimentation and marine processes affect the coast and its resources. It has been shared with researchers, students, and community audiences around the world, most recently in France as part of a Fulbright scholarship. Dr. Walsh looks forward to bringing these same interests to CRC’s expertise in coastal management policy and practice.  “My hope,” says Dr. Walsh, is that “the blending of my work with CRC’s talents and experience will yield benefits for coastal communities in Rhode Island and around the globe.”

 

In addition to his role as CRC Director, Dr. Walsh will conduct research and teach at URI’s Graduate School of Oceanography.

International Students Arrive at URI

Faculty and staff at the Coastal Resources Center (CRC) welcomed 13 international graduate students to URI and Rhode Island last week with a potluck dinner social.

These master’s- and Ph.D.-degree candidates hail from Eritrea, Ghana, Indonesia, and Malawi. They’ll be furthering their studies at URI’s College of Environmental and Life Sciences and Graduate School of Oceanography with financial support from USAID/Ghana’s Sustainable Fisheries Management Project (SFMP), USAID FISH Project in Malawi, and the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. Through CRC’s Ambassador Program, the students are receiving logistical support for living in New England, and have been adopted by a new family of friends and well-wishers.

Registration for FORTIFIED-Wise Training Ends May 3

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To register, go to fortified.archtest.com

The FORTIFIED-Wise course is approved for International Code Council Education Units (CEUs) and American Institute of Architects CES.

Climate Change Expert to Speak at Beach SAMP Meeting May 3

Dr. Michael Oppenheimer, a longtime participant in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007, will share his insights on emerging climate science and trends at the next Beach SAMP stakeholder meeting, Tuesday, May 3, from 6 to 8 p.m. in Corless Auditorium on URI’s Narragansett Bay Campus.

He recently served as a  coordinating lead author of both the IPCC’s special report on extreme climate events and disasters (called SREX) and the Fifth Assessment Report. Dr. Oppenheimer has been a member of several panels of the National Academy of Sciences and is now a member of the National Academies’ Board on Energy and Environmental Studies. He is also a winner of the 2010 Heinz Award and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

His interests include science and policy of the atmosphere, particularly climate change and its impacts. Much of his research aims to understand the potential for “dangerous” outcomes of increasing levels of greenhouse gases by exploring the effects of global warming on the ice sheets and sea level, on the risk from coastal storms and on patterns of human migration.

Pizza will be served in the auditorium library at 5:30. RSVP to beachsamp@etal.uri.edu

Hundreds Attend President Dooley’s Lecture in Ghana

IMG_4440
President Dooley signs a memorandum of understanding with University of Cape Coast, Ghana, colleagues Friday in Ghana. (credit: Patricia Mensah, CRC/SFMP)

Hundreds of people attended Friday’s public lecture by URI President David M. Dooley at the University of Cape Coast (UCC) in Ghana and later witnessed the signing of a memorandum of understanding between CRC/URI and UCC’s Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences and Centre for Coastal Management, during the president’s first trip to the West African nation.

During his talk, President Dooley said his vision upon assuming office as president of URI was to vastly increase internationalization and globalization of the school and its students because the world we live in is not just interconnected but interdependent and hyper-connected. Such hyper-connectedness includes a global economy and society in which citizens communicate in seconds and not in days or weeks. The complexity of the modern world includes great challenges, such as climate change, which is beyond one single nation’s ability to solve alone, he continued.

“With these global challenges also come global opportunities. We need to focus more on the opportunities,” he told the audience.

He continued: The less-developed world is not responsible for the lion’s share of atmospheric changes, but it and the entire world have to live with the consequence. That is not the only challenge with global consequences: War in one country affects the entire world; the outbreak of diseases, quality of the air we breathe, sustainability of the food supply, disputes and conflicts are all global issues, he said.

“We are no longer insulated by borders and oceans as we once were, but in all this, are global opportunities and demand for higher education,” President Dooley said.

During the memorandum of understanding signing ceremony, President Dooley received a gift of rich local Ghanaian kente cloth and sandals. The entire URI delegation received souvenirs from UCC as a symbol of friendship.

President Dooley meets with incoming URI graduate students from Ghana Saturday. (credit: Patricia Mensah, CRC/SFMP)
President Dooley meets with incoming URI graduate students from Ghana Saturday. (credit: Patricia Mensah, CRC/SFMP)

President Dooley continued his inaugural trip to Ghana Saturday when he met with four doctoral and two master’s students bound for URI on a USAID-funded scholarship program. The graduate students went through an intensive and competitive selection process to emerge as recipients of the scholarships. President Dooley congratulated and welcomed the students in advance to URI and hoped they make the most of the experience.

Two USAID projects, USAID/Ghana Sustainable Fisheries Management Project (SFMP) and USAID/UCC Capacity Strengthening Project are collaborating in this effort.

Also Saturday, two research assistants from UCC supporting SFMP’s research and improved data quality systems activities demonstrated how they collect fish stock data.

 

President Dooley Begins Ghana Trip with Visit to UCC

Professor D.D. Kuupole, vice-chancellor of the Univresity of Cape Coast in Ghana welcomes President Dooley Friday, April, 15, 2016. (credit: Patricia Mensah, SFMP/CRC)
Professor D.D. Kuupole, vice-chancellor of the Univresity of Cape Coast in Ghana welcomes President Dooley Friday, April, 15, 2016. (credit: Patricia Mensah, SFMP/CRC)

URI President Dr. David M. Dooley is in Ghana through April 20, solidifying relationships with Ghanaian universities and visiting projects led by CRC: USAID/Ghana Sustainable Fisheries Management Project (SFMP) and USAID/West Africa Analytical Support Services and Evaluations for Sustainable Systems (ASSESS).

On Friday, April, 15, he met with University of Cape Coast (UCC) Vice-Chancellor Professor D.D. Kuupole. President Dooley said he sees his visit as an opportunity to strengthen collaboration and friendship with the wider university community. Prof. Kuupole says UCC treasures the collaboration, which has helped draw the university’s Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences into the limelight.